Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

Policy and Practice Logo

Directory

Graduate student voices image


Taner Akçam

Taner Akçam is a Professor of History at Clark University where he holds the Robert Aram and Marianne Kaloosdian and Stephen and Marian Mugar Chair in Armenian Genocide Studies. An internationally recognized human rights activist, he was one of the first Turkish intellectuals to recognize and openly discuss the Armenian Genocide. He is the author of several books including, most recently, The Young Turks' Crime Against Humanity: The Armenian Genocide and Ethnic Cleansing in the Ottoman Empire (Princeton University Press 2012).

Graduate student voices image


Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs

Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs is the Director of the Center for Holocaust Studies at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow, Poland and a member of the Polish delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (previously called the International Task Force, or ITF). As the Ina Levine Invitational Scholar at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in 2011-12, Ambrosewicz-Jacobs researched the project "Landscapes of (non) Memory: The Holocaust and Coming to Terms with National History and Identity in Education in Post-1989 Poland and the Wider World."


Joyce Apsel

Joyce Apsel is a Master Teacher of Humanities in the Liberal Studies Program at New York University. She is President of the Institute for the Study of Genocide and Director of Rights Works International which is dedicated to promoting peace, human rights, and genocide education around the world. Apsel publishes widely about genocide, children's rights, peace museums, and human rights education. Genocide Matters: Ongoing Issues and New Perspectives, co-edited with Ernesto Verdeja, will be published by Routledge in 2013.

Graduate student voices image


Sabri Atman

Sabri Atman is the Assyrian Genocide Studies Fellow and a first-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. A well-known lecturer and advocate for recognition of the Assyrian Genocide, Atman is the founder and director of Seyfo, the Assyrian Genocide and Research Center. Atman studied economics at the University of Gothenburg, and has published widely about the Assyrian Genocide.

Graduate student voices image


David Bell

David Bell, Chair and Assistant Professor of International Development and Social Change at Clark University, is an educationalist and psychologist who has worked extensively in Southern Africa in the fields of education, empowerment, social transformation, and community development. Bell's current research focuses on the social and political juncture of education policy in Sub-Saharan Africa, transformational leadership, and the role of higher education in social transformation.

Graduate student voices image


Michelle Bellino

Michelle Bellino is a doctoral student studying culture, communities, and education at Harvardss Graduate School of Education. Her research centers on the intersection of historical consciousness and civic development of youth in the aftermath of intergroup conflict, as well as the role of human rights and history education as intergenerational mechanisms of transitional justice. Trained as a cultural anthropologist, she explores these issues through ethnographic fieldwork in Guatemala.

Graduate student voices image


Doga Bilgin

Doga Bilgin is a first-year undergraduate at Clark University studying political science and economics. He is an undergraduate intern at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. His work at the Center allows him to observe the impact of education on public opinion about foreign policy.

Graduate student voices image


Sara E. Brown

Sara E. Brown is the Stern Family Fellow for Genocide Studies and a third-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. Brown holds an MA in Diplomacy and Conflict Studies from the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Israel. Her research focuses on the role of female perpetrators and rescuers during the Rwandan genocide.

Graduate student voices image


Morgan Blum

Morgan Blum is the Director of Education at the San Francisco Jewish Family and Children Services (JFCS) Holocaust Center. Graduated from Clark University with a B.A. in history specializing in Holocaust and genocide studies, Blum wrote her MA thesis on the forced removal of Aboriginal children as a case of genocide at Deakin University, Austrialia. At the JFCS Holocaust Center, Blum teaches seminars, mentors high school students, develops curricula, and leads professional development workshops for educators.

Graduate student voices image


Noreen Brand

Noreen Brand is the founding Director of Education at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie, Illinois. In preparation for the museum's 2007 opening, Brand developed the education program and now manages the speakers' bureau, develops curricula for teacher institutes, oversees community lectures and programs, and provides guidance for the creation and development of a youth exhibit focusing on character education. Brand is the recipient of the Rita and Jacob Salzman 2010 Outstanding Educator Award from the Anne Frank Center USA.

Graduate student voices image


Mikal Brotnov

Mikal Brotnov is a second-year doctoral student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he focuses on Jews and Native Americans in the American West. Brotnov hais a second-year doctoral student at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he focuses on Jews and Native Americans in the American West. Brotnov also works on providing teachers and professors with pedagogical strategies to view American history as part of a settler colonial state. Brotnov attended Clark University where he was a Jack Kent Cooke Foundation scholar, and a Steinbrecher Fellow. A graphic artist and web designer, he has developed print and electronic materials for many Strassler Center projects.

Graduate student voices image


Maggie Campbell

Maggie Campbell is a doctoral student in social psychology at Clark University. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Framingham State University (2008) and her M.A. in Psychology from Clark University (2012). Campbell's research explores the psychology of resistance during genocide and the role of religion in facilitating both violence and peace.

Graduate student voices image


Elizabeth Cole

Elizabeth Cole is a Senior Program Officer at the United States Institute of Peace. Cole has extensive experience in curriculum development and international education, having worked at the Asia Society, the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs, Columbia University, the National Forum Foundation, and the National Endowment for Democracy. She studies how societies reckon with long-term political and social reconciliation and reconstruction following violent conflict or state repression.

Graduate student voices image


Sarah Cushman

Sarah Cushman is the Director of Youth Education at the Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County. Cushman earned her Ph.D. from Clark University where she held the Steven Spielberg Fellowship for Graduate Studies in Holocaust History. Her dissertation, "The Women of Birkenau," uses a gendered lens to analyze three groups of women in Auschwitz: prisoners, prisoner functionaries, and women camp guards. As Director of Youth Education, Cushman develops and implements programs, works with student interns, recruits and trains volunteer education staff, assists in developing and implementing programs for adults, and conducts outreach to educational communities across Long Island.

Graduate student voices image


Eric DeMeulenaere

Eric DeMeulenaere is an Assistant Professor at the Jacob Hiatt Center for Urban Education at Clark University. He has worked in urban education as a teacher and as the founder and principal of an innovative small high school focused on social justice. In addition to teaching at Clark, he seeks to engage teachers to examine their teaching practices critically and to develop more balanced pedagogical practices. His forthcoming book, Reflections from the Field: How Coaching Made us Better Teachers, co-authored with Collete Cann, will be available in 2013.

Graduate student voices image


Jane Denny

Jane Denny is Director of Education at the Center for Holocaust, Human Rights and Genocide Education at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft, NJ. Denny serves as an adjunct professor of history and teaches the only Holocaust and Genocide course in the social sciences at the college. Denny received her BA in Soviet Area Studies at Syracuse University, and a MLS at Plattsburgh State University. She wrote her MA thesis at Monmouth University on the Holocaust in the Baltic States.

Graduate student voices image


Debórah Dwork

Debórah Dwork is the Rose Professor of Holocaust History at Clark University. As founding Director of the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, she has given shape to a forum for Holocaust and genocide education and scholarship, dedicated to teaching, research, and public service. She is now counted a leading authority on university education in this field. A member of the U.S. delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, Dwork serves on numerous advisory boards and works with non-profit organizations concerned with Holocaust education. Dwork is the author of many books on Holocaust history, including (most recently), A Boy in Terezin (2012) and Flight from the Reich (2009). Her current book project, Saints and Liars, explores the history of Americans who traveled to Europe to aid and, if possible, rescue imperiled Jews.

Graduate student voices image


Khamboly Dy

Khamboly Dy is Director of the School of Genocide, Conflicts and Human Rights Studies of the newly established Sleuk Rith Institute, the permanent Documentation Center of Cambodia. Currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Division of Global Affairs at Rutgers University, he has an M.A. from the same program, a B.B.A from the National University of Management, and a B.A. from the Royal University of Phnom Penh. He has worked as a researcher and project team leader at the Documentation Center of Cambodia where he coordinated the Genocide Education Project. He is the author of the first book for high school students in Cambodia about the Cambodian genocide entitled A History of Democratic Kampuchea (2007).

Graduate student voices image


Monique Eckmann

Monique Eckmann is a Professor at the School for Social Work, University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland in Geneva. Eckmann has published widely and taught about intercultural education and antiracist education, antisemitism and right-wing extremism, intergroup conflicts, and human rights education. She has served as a member of the Swiss delegation to the Holocaust Era Assets Conference, as an expert member of the Swiss Foundation for School Projects Against Racism, as a member of the Swiss Federal delegation in the U.N. Conference against Racism and, since 2004, is a permanent member of the Swiss delegation to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance.

Graduate student voices image


Karel Fracapane

Karel Fracapane is Senior Officer at the Division of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development at UNESCO where he is in charge of Holocaust issues. Fracapane holds a degree in literature from the University of Angers and graduate and post-graduate degrees from the Institutes of Political Studies in Bordeaux and Paris. Fracapane previously served at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, at the International Task Force (now the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance), and as the Head of International Relations for the Memorial for the Shoah in Paris.

Graduate student voices image


Michael Geheran

Michael Geheran is the Tapper Fellow and a fifth-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. His dissertation, "Betrayed Comradeship: German-Jewish World War I Veterans under Hitler," analyzes the experiences of Jewish war veterans in Nazi Germany before and during the Holocaust. Geheranss research has been supported by fellowships from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM), the German Historical Institute, a Fulbright Fellowship, and a Leo Baeck Institute/DAAD Research Grant.

Graduate student voices image


Adara Goldberg

Adara Goldberg is the Education Director at the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre. She received her Ph.D. (2012) from the Strassler Center at Clark University where she held the Shirley and Ralph Rose Fellowship in Holocaust History. Her dissertation, "We Were Called Greenies: Holocaust Survivors in Postwar Canada," is under contract with the University of Manitoba Press. She previously served as a research consultant for a curriculum project on the MS St. Louis Ship in relationship to Canada's pre- and post-World War II immigration policy.

Graduate student voices image


Dotan Greenvald

Dotan Greenvald, an Israeli human rights activist, is the Simon and Eve Colin Fellow and a first-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. After serving as an infantry sniper for the Israel Defense Forces during the Second Intifada, Greenvald co-founded the Israeli NGO Breaking the Silence, an organization comprised of soldiers committed to ending the Israel/Palestine conflict. Greenvald's current research centers on the ways Holocaust collective memory in Israel has shaped political developments in Israel and Palestine since the second Intifada in 2000.

Graduate student voices image


Ayşe Gül Altinay

Ayşe Gül Altinay is a Professor at Sabanci University in Istanbul. She holds a Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology from Duke University. Her research and publications have focused on militarism, nationalism, violence, memory, gender, and sexuality. She is the author of The Myth of the Military-Nation: Militarism, Gender, and Education in Turkey and co-author of Violence Against Women in Turkey: A Nationwide Survey (with YeÅŸim Arat, 2009). Her 2009 book Torunlar, with Fethiye Çetin, is based on Muslim grandchildren’s narratives of their converted Armenian grandparents.

Graduate student voices image


Kathrin Haurand

Kathrin Haurand is a Claims Conference fellow and a second-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. She holds an MA in Cultural Studies and History from the Viadrina European University in Germany. Haurand worked with the oral history archives at the Free University in Berlin to develop learning materials and integrate testimonies into Holocaust curricula for schools. Haurand plans to write her dissertation on "Jews in Iran during World War II."

Graduate student voices image


Alexis Herr

Alexis Herr is a sixth-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. She has a BA in British Literature and Italian Studies from Claremont McKenna College. Herr holds a Saul Kagan Fellowship in Advanced Shoah Studies from the Claims Conference. Herr's research has been supported by fellowships from the National Institute for the History of the Liberation Movement in Italy (in collaboration with the Italian Scientists and Scholars in North American Foundation) and the Holocaust Educational Foundation. She is completing her dissertation on "Fossoli di Carpi, 1942-1952."

Graduate student voices image


Millie Jasper

Millie Jasper is the Executive Director of the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center in White Plains, New York, which provides Holocaust and human rights educational programming to nearly 12,000 students and teachers. Jasper currently serves as co-chair of "Walking Together," an interfaith educational program for Jewish, Christian, and Muslim students and parents at Temple Israel of Northern Westchester.

Graduate student voices image


Tararith Kho

Tararith Kho, a poet and writer, was instrumental in founding the PEN-Cambodia chapter. Kho is the co-founder and director of the Nou Hach Literary Project, an organization dedicated to the promotion and encouragement of literary arts in Cambodia. The Project's goal is to reintroduce Cambodians to reading Khmer literature which has yet to recover from the violence of the Khmer Rouge era. He served as the 2011-2012 Harvard University Scholars at Risk Fellow, and is currently teaching Khmer language and literature at Middlesex Community College in Massachusetts.

Graduate student voices image


Elisabeth King

Elisabeth King is a Fellow at the Balsillie School of International Affairs,University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. King works on issues at the intersection of conflict, peace building, and development in sub-Saharan Africa. Using research methods ranging from in-depth qualitative research to quantitative surveys and field experiments, her recent projects examine how presumed social goods — such as education and community-driven development interventions — may also contribute to conflict. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto and served as a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at Columbia University.

Graduate student voices image


Thomas Kühne

Thomas Kühne is the Strassler Professor of Holocaust History at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. His research explores the relation of war, genocide, and society, long-term traditions of political culture and political emotions in Europe, and the problem of locating the Holocaust and Nazi Germany in the continuities and discontinuities of the 20th century. In 2010, he published Belonging and Genocide. Hitler’s Community, 1918-1945. As a Guggenheim Fellow, he spent 2010-11 at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ where he worked on the volume Globalizing Beauty. Body Aesthetics in the 20th Century, co-edited with Hartmut Berghoff, to appear in 2013.

Graduate student voices image


Ümit Kurt

Ümit Kurt is an Agnes Manoogian Hausrath Fellow and a third-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. Kurt received his MA in European Studies from Sabancı University, Istanbul. His dissertation focuses on the confiscation of Armenian properties and the role of local elites in the province of Aintab, Turkey during the Armenian genocide. He is the author of two books in Turkish, one of which is co-authored with Taner Akçam and elucidates how Turkish laws and regulations led to the "legalized" theft of Armenian properties in the aftermath of deportation and genocide.

Graduate student voices image


Yariv Lapid

Yariv Lapid is the Director of Education at the Mauthausen Memorial in Austria where he has developed a new pedagogical infrastructure. Lapid studied history at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at the University of Hamburg, Germany. He has long worked on advancing dialogue between conflict groups and developing educational cooperation between Europe and Yad Vashem. Lapid's work focuses on fostering discussion about the meaning of the Holocaust between societies with differing, and at times contradictory, collective memories. An important aspect of Lapid’s work has been developing strategies to reflect on evil actions as an aspect of normative human behavior.

Graduate student voices image


Natalya Lazar

Natalya Lazar is the Hevrony Family Fellow and a fifth-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. Lazar's dissertation, "Czernowitz Jews and the Holocaust," explores the dynamics of interethnic relations and how Czernowitz's multiethnic composition shaped collaboration and rescue during the Holocaust. Supported by a Black Sea Link Fellowship, a research grant from the Foundation for Urban and Regional Studies, and a Kirsch Research Award, Lazar conducted research in Ukraine, Romania, Israel, and the United States.

Graduate student voices image


Sara Levy

Sara Levy is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Education at Wells College. Her research interests center on the connection of students' identities, specifically their racial, religious, ethnic, national, and socioeconomic status, with the histories presented in formal school curricula. Prior to earning her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Minnesota, Levy was the program coordinator of the Holocaust Studies and Critical Thinking Program for the Silicon Valley Conference for Community & Justice. She earned her BA and MA degrees at Clark University, where she focused on Holocaust history.

Graduate student voices image


Mikaela Luttrell-Rowland

Mikaela Luttrell-Rowland serves as the Academic Program Liaison Officer at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University and a lecturer in the departments of Women Studies and Sociology. Luttrell-Rowland is the recipient of numerous fellowships including a Fulbright Teaching Fellowship that took her to South Korea. She is the author of several works on children's rights. Luttrell-Rowland holds a PhD in International Development from the University of Bath, and an MSc from the University of Oxford in Comparative Social Policy. She has conducted fieldwork about inequality and young people in Peru, South Korea, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Graduate student voices image


Ken MacLean

Ken MacLean is an Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change and the Director of Asian Studies at Clark University. His research focuses on ethnographic approaches to the study of states and state-effects, violence and repression, forced and irregular migration, (post-) socialism, legal regimes and documentation, critical security studies, and digital communication technologies. MacLean has conducted fieldwork in conflict-torn regions of Southeast Asia, especially Burma. He also worked with NGOs and as an activist throughout the region.

Graduate student voices image


Shelby Margolin

Shelby Margolin is an undergraduate senior at Clark University studying International Development and Social Change with a concentration in Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Margolin has served as the lead program intern at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies for the past two years. Her work at the Center complements the research for her honors thesis, "Silencing Knowledge: Representations of Holocaust Perpetrators in American Popular Culture".

Graduate student voices image


Lucas Mazur

Lucas Mazur is a doctoral student in social psychology at Clark University. His research explores the social cognition underlying comparisons of collective suffering. He seeks to understand perceptions of victim prototypicality as well as stereotype transformation over the course of sustained collective violence and genocide. Mazur holds a BA from the University of Pittsburgh, an MA in Sociology from Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland, and an MA in Psychology from the New School in New York City.

Graduate student voices image


Dyan Mazurana

Dyan Mazurana is a Research Director at the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University and teaches graduate courses at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She works with many governments, UN agencies, and human rights and child protection organizations to improve efforts to assist youth and women affected by armed conflict, including those associated with fighting forces. Mazurana's specific areas of focus include women's and children's human rights, war-affected civilian populations, armed opposition groups, armed conflict, and peacekeeping. She has published widely on these topics.

Graduate student voices image


Sara Michaels

Sara Michaels is Education Department Chair and Senior Research Scholar at the Jacob Hiatt Center for Urban Education at Clark University. Michaels is involved in a range of research projects that focus on academically productive talk in math, science, and English Language Arts, from pre-kindergarten through high school. She is currently helping to develop a teacher learning resource for K-12 science education: the Next Generation Science Exemplar is an innovative platform designed to help teachers better understand the Next Generation Science Standards. The project recently received a major grant from the National Science Foundation.

Graduate student voices image


Rashmi Nair

Rashmi Nair is a doctoral student in social psychology at Clark University studying the factors that lead to inter-group helping and tension in the aftermath of inter-group conflict and violence. Before joining Clark, Nair was dedicated to conflict resolution and transformation in India. She has worked with several NGOs on human rights issues, empowerment, and promotion of inter-religious understanding.

Graduate student voices image


Michael Nolte

Michael Nolte is a Claims Conference Fellow and a third-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. Nolte has a degree in Political Science from Marburg University in Germany. His dissertation, "Zones of Death: Auschwitz, Ravenbrück, Bergen-Belsen, May 1944-May 1945," focuses on the evolution of Nazi killing sites as a distinct realm in the spatial order of German-occupied Europe.

Graduate student voices image


Dorit Novak

Dorit Novak serves as Director of the International School for Holocaust Studies at Yad Vashem, Israel. Novak piloted the "Welfare to Work" project aimed at reducing unemployment benefit recipients, under the auspices of the Israeli Ministry of Industry, Trade and Labor. Novak also launched and directed the country-wide educational NGO "Haznek," to assist students with their after-school studies. During her military service, Novak served in various educational capacities and as the head of both the Advocacy and Culture departments.

Graduate student voices image


Tracey Petersen

Tracey Petersen is the Education Director of the Cape Town Holocaust Centre where she facilitates educational programs for high school students, educators, and the general public. She is working toward a Ph.D. in history at the University of the Western Cape. Petersen's focus lies in the field of human rights education, Holocaust education, and teacher development in societies recently emerging from repressive regimes. She holds an M.Phil in Education from the University of Cape Town and has taught history and English in South African government schools.

Graduate student voices image


Mike Poliec

Mike Poliec is a Claims Conference Fellow and a second-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. He holds a BA in Psychology and MA in Jewish Culture and Civilization from the University of Bucharest. Poliec studied Judaism and the Holocaust with Paideia, the European Institute for Jewish Studies in Sweden. Poliec's dissertation will investigate civilian collaboration in anti-Jewish violence in Bessarabia and Bukovina during the Holocaust.

Graduate student voices image


Carolyn Rapkievian

Carolyn Rapkievian is the Assistant Director for Education and Museum Programs at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian. Rapkievian oversees the museum's interpretive projects and departments, and is currently engaged with developing best practices to define and teach about the genocide(s) of Native Peoples of the Western Hemisphere. Rapkievian received a B.A. in Anthropology and a M.A. in Museum Science and, prior to her current position, held leadership posts at history, science, and art museums around the country.

Graduate student voices image


Mary Jane Rein

Mary Jane Rein is Executive Director of the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Trained as a classical archaeologist, she conducted archaeological fieldwork at Sardis in Turkey and received a Ph.D. from Harvard University for her dissertation "The Cult and Iconography of Lydian Kybele." As Executive Director, she implements stragies for the Center’s growth. To that end, she serves as editor-in-chief of the Year End Report, directs Center fundraising, admissions, communications, and seeks fellowship and employment opportunities for Center doctoral students.

 


Raphael E. Rogers

Raphael E. Rogers is a visiting Assistant Professor at the Jacob Hiatt Center for Urban Education at Clark University. He engages young people in development of their urban communities and supports youth leaders who are interested in being critical participants in urban and metropolitan change. He wrote his dissertation, "Slavery on Their Minds: Representing the Institution in Children's and Young Adult Literature," at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Rogers has taught in public schools throughout Massachusetts and has served as a literacy coach, consultant, and a university supervisor of student teachers.

Graduate student voices image


Hanna Schmidt Holländer

Hanna Schmidt Holländer is a doctoral student at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Holländer holds a MA in history, German literature, and educational studies. A visiting scholar at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University, she is working on her dissertation, "Ghetto Schools: Education in Jewish Ghettos in Nazi-Occupied Poland."

Graduate student voices image


Simone Schweber

Simone Schweber holds the Michael and Judy Goodman Chair of Education and Jewish Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she teaches courses on social studies methods, qualitative research, religion, and public education. She has published widely about teaching the Holocaust in public schools and religious schools; her books include Making Sense of the Holocaust: Lessons from Classroom Practice (2004) and Teaching the Holocaust (2007). Schweber's research examines what students know about the Holocaust, what they learn in formal and informal schooling contexts, and what they absorb from their home environments.

Graduate student voices image


Shannon Scully

Shannon Scully is the Cummings Fellow of Comparative Genocide and a first-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. She plans to write her dissertation on the use of human remains in memorialization practices in post-genocide Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. She is a photographer and comes to Clark from the Kigali Genocide Memorial in Rwanda where she served as the Photographic and Physical Collections Officer. Her photographs are currently displayed in the Strassler Center exhibition Never/Again.

Graduate student voices image


Margot Stern Strom

Margot Stern Strom is the Founder and Executive Director of Facing History and Ourselves, and has become an international leader in education for justice and the preservation of democracy. She has spent more than thirty years as an educator, author, and lecturer. Her commitment to honoring the voices of teachers and students and her deep belief that history matters has enabled millions of students to study the Holocaust, to investigate root causes of racism, antisemitism, and violence, and to realize their obligations and capabilities as citizens in a democracy.

Graduate student voices image


Cecilie Stokholm Banke

Cecilie Stokholm Banke is Senior Researcher and head of the Research Unit on Holocaust and Genocide at the Danish Institute for International Studies in Copenhagen. Her research concerns the politics of memory and memory culture in Europe after 1989, specifically regarding the Holocaust and other mass atrocities including the Armenian genocide, Ukraine 1932-33, the former Yugoslavia, and Spain. She serves as a Danish delegate to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance and, occasionally, to the United Nations General Assembly. In 2009, she was a Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the Strassler Center.

Graduate student voices image


Dottie Stone

Dottie Stone is a former teacher and currently the Director of Educational Outreach at the Holocaust Documentation and Education Center in Hollywood, Florida. She holds a PhD in Holocaust History from the Strassler Center at Clark University, a MA in Holocaust and Genocide Studies from West Chester University, and a BSED in History from Ohio Northern University. Stone spent a year in Cape Town and Johannesburg researching her dissertation, "Seeking Asylum: German Jewish Refugees in South Africa," where she witnessed a post-apartheid society in transition.

Graduate student voices image


Shelly Tenenbaum

Shelly Tenenbaum is a Professor of Sociology and Coordinator of Undergraduate Activities in Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. Her research on ethnic enterprise, mutual aid, gender, education, and identity intersects the broad areas of sociology of American Jews and historical sociology. She teaches in the areas of race and ethnicity, Jewish studies, comparative genocide, gender, and social stratification. With a special interest in pedagogy, Tenenbaum has served as chair of the Pedagogy Working Group for the Association for Jewish Studies.

Graduate student voices image


Jason Tingler

Jason Tingler is a Claims Conference Fellow and first-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. He has a B.A. from Youngstown State University in History and Political Science, and a M.A. from Drew University in Modern European Intellectual and Cultural History. Tingler plans to write his dissertation on the mass killing of Jews and Poles in the Lublin district of occupied Poland.

Graduate student voices image


Johanna Vollhardt

Johanna Vollhardt, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Clark University, researches the psychological impact of group-based victimization on people's social identity and on relations with members of other groups. She is interested in the underlying social psychological processes and conditions that give rise to constructive, rather than destructive, outcomes of victimization. Vollhardt conducts research among ethnic, religious, and national (minority) groups in the U.S., Europe, India, and East Africa. She also collaborates with the NGO Radio La Benevolencija, which combines applied psychology with education-entertainment techniques to address post-conflict violence in the Great Lakes Region of Africa.

Graduate student voices image


Sarah Warshauer Freedman

Sarah Warshauer Freedman is a Professor at the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research explores how students who are most underserved by US schools and universities learn to write and how teachers learn to instruct these students. She also has studied the role of schools around the world in helping young people recover from mass violence and in helping them navigate divisions in their societies. She received a 3-year grant from the Spencer Foundation to collaborate with Facing History and Ourselves to study how youth in Northern Ireland, South Africa, and the United States learn to become civic actors.

Graduate student voices image


Wolf-Gero Westhoff

Wolf-Gero Westhoff is the Ralph and Shirley Rose Fellow and a first-year doctoral student at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. Westhoff holds a BA in European Studies from Franklin College, Switzerland and an MA in Contemporary History from the Université Fribourg, Switzerland. Westhoff will write his dissertation on German officers' involvement in the Ottoman army's actions during the Armenian genocide.