George Perkins Marsh Institute

News

Clark University student researchers receive Marsh-Mosakowski NOAA Fellowships

Four Clark University students have been named 2017 Marsh-Mosakowski NOAA Fellows and soon will embark on summer internships to conduct ecological research alongside esteemed scientists in Maryland and Massachusetts.

Scientists and managers with NOAA are partnering for a fifth year with Clark University to offer qualified undergraduate students paid summer field internships in NOAA labs and offices, working in fields such as applied ocean and atmospheric science, policy, and science communication. Each student is overseen by a NOAA scientist or manager and advised by a Clark faculty mentor.

The 2017 Marsh-Mosakowski NOAA Fellows are:

Anderson

Tyler Anderson (Environmental Science'18) will work in Maryland on the project "Rapid Bathymetry for Safer Navigation: Developing an Automated Process". His Clark faculty mentor is Associate Professor Chris Williams from the Graduate School of Geography.


Kreckel

Anika Kreckel (Economics '18) will work in Maryland on the project "Advancing Integration of Natural Capital Principles into American Businesses". Assistant Director Dana Marie Bauer (Marsh Institute) will serve as her faculty mentor.


Robbins

Carly Robbins (Geography '18) will work in Maryland on the project "Finding Harmful Algae with High Resolution Satellite". Her Clark faculty mentor is Assistant Professor Florencia Sangermano from the Graduate School of Geography.


Stabulas

Alexis Stabulas (Environmental Science and Policy '18) will work in Massachusetts on the project "Endangered Species Act-Listed Species Tracking". Her Clark faculty mentor is Associate Professor John Baker from the Biology Department.


For more information about Clark's NOAA Internship Program, contact Robert J. Johnston, Director of the George Perkins Marsh Institute at 508.751.4619 or Jim Gomes, Director of the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise at 508.421.3872.

Guidance for Stated Preference Valuation Published

George Perkins Marsh Institute director Robert Johnston is among the lead authors of the new article Contemporary Guidance for Stated Preference Studies, recently published by the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. This article proposes best-practice guidance for stated preference studies used to inform decision-making, grounded in extensive input from the profession and the accumulated body of research in this area. Stated preference (SP) methods such as contingent valuation and discrete choice experiments estimate measures of economic value using responses to survey questions. They are only known means to estimate values for changes in many public goods including environmental services, human health effects, and other outcomes for which observed behavioral (or revealed preference) data are not available. They are the only available means to estimate non-use values, or use values associated with changes that fall outside the range of currently observed conditions. Stated preference methods thus have a unique role in policy analysis. This article provides the most comprehensive set of recommendations for stated preference studies available.

The direct link to the article may be found at The University of Chicago Press Journals.

National Academy of Sciences Appoints Clark Geographer to International Arctic Group

Karen Frey in the Arctic

Karen E. Frey, associate professor in the Clark University Graduate School of Geography and research associate professor in the George Perkins Marsh Institute, has been appointed by the National Academy of Sciences to serve on the Marine Working Group of the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC). Only two U.S. scientists were appointed to this prestigious group; Frey will serve at least one four-year term.

The IASC is a non-governmental, international scientific organization that encourages and facilitates collaboration on Arctic research. The IASC has five working groups (Atmosphere, Cryosphere, Marine, Social and Human, and Terrestrial); the United States can appoint up to two scientists to serve in each working group, with two additional delegates serving as team leaders. A complete list of appointees can be found online. More »

Balancing the Health Risks and Benefits of Seafood: How Does Available Guidance Affect Consumer Choices?

American Journal of Agricultural Economics 4/5/2017

Professor Robert Johnston co-authored this study, the abstract of which begins: "Seafood species vary in their health benefits (e.g., from omega-3 fatty acids) and risks (e.g., from methylmercury or polychlorobiphenyls). Reflecting these risks and benefits, multiple public and private organizations offer guidance to consumers on seafood consumption. The effect of this guidance is unknown; previous literature has been unable to disentangle the effects of messages with differing health information, provided by different sources, on demand for different types of seafood." More »

Anthony Bebbington Awarded 2017 Australian Laureate Fellowship

Bebbington

Professor Anthony Bebbington, Director of the Graduate School of Geography and Marsh Institute researcher, was recently awarded a $2.8 million Australian Laureate Fellowship from the Australian Research Council. The project entitled "Mining and Society in a Changing Environment: Pathways to Sustainability" will conduct a systematic comparative analysis of mining activities across Latin America, Australasia, and South-East Asia, drawing on political ecology, sustainability science, indigenous geography, and geographic information science.

Brown and Vergragt Publish New Book on Post-Consumer Society

Social Change and the Coming Post-Consumer Society cover

Halina Brown, Professor of Environmental Science and Policy, and Philip Vergragt, both Marsh Institute researchers, along with colleague Maurie Cohen of the New Jersey Institute of Technology, recently published the book Social Change and the Coming Post-Consumer Society, which explores the relevant processes of social change and identifies effective interventions for enabling a transition beyond the present energy and material-intensive consumer society.

Yuko Aoyama Publishes New Book on Collaborative Governance

Aoyama

Yuko Aoyama, Professor in the Graduate School of Geography and Marsh Institute researcher, with Balaji Parthasarathy of the International Institute of Information Technology, recently published the book The Rise of the Hybrid Domain: Collaborative Governance for Social Innovation, which explores possibilities for new governance structures that blend social and economic missions and advance the livelihoods of the poor in the Global South.

Geller Student Fellowships Awarded to Four Graduate Students

The Albert, Norma and Howard '77 Geller Endowed Research Awards support student-initiated research projects that advance our understanding of natural resource and environmental sustainability and develop practical improvements that move society towards more sustainable outcomes. Remembering his own experience as an activist student researcher at Clark, Dr. Howard Geller (Science, Technology, and Society '77) hopes to support other Clark undergraduate and graduate students through these annual awards.

Four student projects were funded in 2017:

  • Yifan Cai, "Variegated Green Capitalism and the Decentralized Developmental State: A Case Study on the Low-speed Electric Vehicle (LSEV) Industry in Shandong, China."
  • Janae Davis, "Toward a Framework for Decolonizing Integrated Conservation and Development Projects at Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park."
  • Carlos Dobler-Morales, "Integrating Remote Sensing with Local Perceptions to Characterize Droughts in Rural Mexico."
  • Alex Moulton, "Managing resources in Jamaica's Blue and John Crow Mountains National Park."

View the detailed project descriptions on the Geller Research Fellowship page.

Clark Researcher Explores the Impact of Arctic Melt

Melishia Santiago records data in a lab at Clark University

Clark University doctoral candidate Melishia Santiago grew up with palm trees and warm weather near sunny Atlantic beaches in Florida and Puerto Rico before coming north to Massachusetts for college. Now, she spends her time thinking about ice, specifically how climate change impacts sea-ice extent in the western Arctic Ocean. More »