George Perkins Marsh Institute

NOAA Summer Internships

Scientists and managers with NOAA are partnering for a fifth year with Clark University to offer qualified undergraduate students paid summer field internships in NOAA labs and offices, working in fields such as applied ocean and atmospheric science, policy, and science communication. Each student is overseen by a NOAA scientist or manager and advised by a Clark faculty mentor.

The 2017 Marsh-Mosakowski NOAA Fellows are:

Anderson

Tyler Anderson (Environmental Science'18) will work in Maryland on the project "Rapid Bathymetry for Safer Navigation: Developing an Automated Process". His Clark faculty mentor is Associate Professor Chris Williams from the Graduate School of Geography.


Kreckel

Anika Kreckel (Economics '18) will work in Maryland on the project "Advancing Integration of Natural Capital Principles into American Businesses". Assistant Director Dana Marie Bauer (Marsh Institute) will serve as her faculty mentor.


Robbins

Carly Robbins (Geography '18) will work in Maryland on the project "Finding Harmful Algae with High Resolution Satellite". Her Clark faculty mentor is Assistant Professor Florencia Sangermano from the Graduate School of Geography.


Stabulas

Alexis Stabulas (Environmental Science and Policy '18) will work in Massachusetts on the project "Endangered Species Act-Listed Species Tracking". Her Clark faculty mentor is Associate Professor John Baker from the Biology Department.


For more information about Clark's NOAA Internship Program, contact Robert J. Johnston, Director of the George Perkins Marsh Institute at 508.751.4619 or Jim Gomes, Director of the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise at 508.421.3872.

NOAA Internship Opportunities for Summer 2017

NOAA

The George Perkins Marsh Institute announces a competitive internship program for Clark University undergraduate students interested in ocean, coastal and atmospheric research. This program is sponsored by the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise and the George Perkins Marsh Institute, in partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science.

Through this program, scientists and managers with NOAA are partnering with Clark University to offer qualified undergraduate students paid summer field internships for summer 2017. Opportunities will be available in NOAA labs and offices nationwide, working in fields such as applied ocean and atmospheric science, policy, and science communication. Each student's summer activities will be overseen by a NOAA scientist or manager, an advised by a Clark faculty mentor. Internships will be offered in natural and social sciences, and are for a period of approximately 10 weeks. Starting dates are flexible, but most internships will begin in June and end in August. Interns will be selected on a competitive basis, and will receive a summer stipend of $4500.

Available internship opportunities and full application guidelines are available here. Student applications are due on February 27. We anticipate placing three interns from Clark during summer 2017. Any questions should be directed to Robert J. Johnston, Director of the George Perkins Marsh Institute.

Deadlines and Dates

The 2017 award competition is now closed. Information on the 2018 competition will be forthcoming.

Questions should be directed to Robert Johnston, Director of the George Perkins Marsh Institute.

2016 NOAA Fellows and Their Project Decscriptions

Congressional Communications for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

NOAA Fellow: Rebecca Hadik, Political Science '17
Faculty Mentor: Amy Richter
Location: Maryland

Hadik

Hadik interned at the NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research's Formulation and Congressional Analysis Division, which develops the Office's budget and defends it to the President and Congress. As part of her internship experience, she translated scientific information for delivery to Congress and interpreted congressional actions for a scientific audience. Her tasks included editing draft reports to Congress on scientific topics, tracking legislation of interest, compiling remarks from relevant floor speeches, attending and summarizing congressional hearings and briefings, and reviewing summaries of scientific programs.

GIS Intern for NOAA's Hawaii-focused Sentinel Site Program/Habitat Blueprint and NOAA's Office for Coastal Management

NOAA Fellow: Isabel Miranda, Global Environmental Studies '17
Faculty Mentor: John Rogan
Location: Hawaii

Miranda

Miranda participated in several projects for the NOAA Office of Coastal Management including: creating outreach materials on anchialine pools (brackish water bodies with cultural and ecological significance) in Hawaii; mapping fires in Guam to help the US Forest Service target campaigns at reducing intentional burns; and mapping data locations for the Citizen Science King Tides Project.

Climate Effects on Physiology and Life History for Southwest Fisheries Ecology

NOAA Fellow: Kristen Sheldon, Biology '17
Faculty Mentor: Deb Robertson
Location: California

Sheldon

Sheldon worked at the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Ecology Division to understand the mechanisms by which fish populations respond to environmental changes. Specifically, she investigated whether maternal or paternal effects are more important in shaping sheepshead minnow offspring's phenotype and reaction norm in response to temperature, which can be essential in understanding the adaptations of marine organisms to climate change.