Women's and Gender Studies

Mosiac of Knowledge fall-lectures

Fall 2015 Lecture Series

How Gender Makes the World Go Round

Fall Lecture Series Calendar PDF
All lectures are free and open to the public.
Sponsored by Women's and Gender Studies, IDCE, and the Political Science Department through The Francis A. Harrington Public Affairs Fund.


NorthFace, Mango and Nike

Thursday, September 24 |11:45am-1:15pm
Johnson Auditorium (120 Sackler Science Building)
Cynthia Enloe, PhD

Popular clothing brands have been globalized. So has the labor that makes them, while brand-name companies rely on ideas about young women in Bangladesh, China and Guatemala to maximize their profits. Paying attention to those young women's lives can help us weigh how complicit we are in development gaps and in human rights violations.


Objectification in Action: Self- and Other- Objectification in Mixed-Sex Interpersonal Interactions

Thursday, October 15 | 11:45am-1:15pm
Johnson Auditorium (120 Sackler Science Building)
Randi Garcia, PhD
The process of sexual objectification is theorized to occur within interpersonal interactions. In this talk, Dr. Randi Garcia presents her research findings about the interplay of sexual objectification and self-objectification,how objectification by others impacts self-objectification and resulting feelings of comfort and authenticity. Results showed that for women only, being objectified by their male interaction partner was associated with an increase in self-objectification, and self-objectification led to perceptions that the interaction was less comfortable and authentic. For both men and women, having authentic interactions was found to relate positively to relationship agency and, for women only, positively to career aspirations.


Is ISIS a Development Issue?

Thursday, October 22 | 11:45am-1:15pm
Johnson Auditorium (120 Sackler Science Building)

Cynthia Enloe, PhD
The rise of ISIS in Syria and Iraq has depended on enticing young men to become fighters, but also on the abuse of women and recruitment of women. Each of these grows out of particular forms of gendered under-development, not only in the Middle East, but in Europe and North America.


Feminists Challenge the UN

Thursday, November 5 | 11:45am-1:15pm
Johnson Auditorium (120 Sackler Science Building)
Cynthia Enloe, PhD
Away from the narrow vision of the media, a transnational feminist movement has been growing that puts UN politics on center stage. These savvy activists can show us how genuine development and sustainable peace require taking women's ideas and women's rights seriously. The opposition they face is formidable.


About our Speakers

Cynthia Enloe is currently a Research Professor in the International Development, Community, and Environment Department (IDCE). Professor Enloe’s feminist teaching and research have focused on the interplay of women’s politics in the national and international arenas, with special attention to how women’s labor is made cheap in globalized factories (especially sneaker factories) and how women’s emotional and physical labor has been used to support many governments’ war-waging policies—and how diverse women have tried to resist both of those efforts. Racial, class, ethnic and national identities as well as pressures shaping ideas about femininities and masculinities are common threads throughout her studies.


 

Tanya Henderson Dr. Randi Garcia earned her B.A. in psychology and women’s studies from the University of California, Los Angeles and Ph.D in social psychology from the University of Connecticut. After graduate school she held a postdoctoral research associate position at Princeton University. She joined Clark University in Fall 2014 and is currently teaching introductory statistics. Blending Social Psychological and Methodological interests, Dr. Garcia’s research focuses on understanding how the dynamics of interpersonal interactions and perceptions are affected by differences in group membership (i.e., intergroup-interpersonal interactions).

 


Fall 2014 Lecture Series

Becoming a Gender Smart Investigator

All lectures are free and open to the public.
Sponsored by Women's and Gender Studies, IDCE, and the Political Science Department through The Francis A. Harrington Public Affairs Fund.


The Syrian War in Year 3: Where are the Women? Where are the Men? Why does it Matter?

Thursday, October 23 | 11:45am-1:15pm
121 Sackler Science Building

Cynthia Enloe, PhD

The Syrian civil war has been devastating. Has it now become a male-only affair? Yet Syrian feminists refuse to disappear - what are they doing? Digging into the gendered stages of any war makes us smarter about that war and about steps toward a potentially sustainable peace.


How to Conduct Your Own Feminist Investigation of the Media

Thursday, October 30 | 11:45am-1:15pm
121 Sackler Science Building

Cynthia Enloe, PhD

Media in all countries are becoming more diverse. But are they becoming less sexist? Less militarized? It takes feminist sleuthing skills to change the gendered politics of film, television, newspapers, radio and the Internet.


Women in Action: Fostering Women’s Political Participation Worldwide

Thursday, November 6 | 11:45am-1:15pm
121 Sackler Science Building

Tanya Henderson

The presence of women in government is important not only to secure the equal rights of women, but for the nature of governance itself. Why is women’s political participation essential to building and sustaining democracy? What obstacles do women face when striving to participate in political life? This talk will explore case studies of how women and countries are successfully fostering women's political participation.


You’re Living in an Institutional Culture. How to Tell if You are Complicit in Its Patriarchy

Thursday, November 13 | 11:45am-1:15pm
121 Sackler Science Building

Cynthia Enloe, PhD

Sexual assaults in militaries and on college campuses. Lack of enforcement of gender equity mandates in humanitarian interventions. Unspoken gender codes and everyday practice subvert efforts to create more creative, transparent and fair institutions.


About our Speakers

Cynthia Enloe is currently a Research Professor in the International Development, Community, and Environment Department (IDCE). Professor Enloe’s feminist teaching and research have focused on the interplay of women’s politics in the national and international arenas, with special attention to how women’s labor is made cheap in globalized factories (especially sneaker factories) and how women’s emotional and physical labor has been used to support many governments’ war-waging policies—and how diverse women have tried to resist both of those efforts. Racial, class, ethnic and national identities as well as pressures shaping ideas about femininities and masculinities are common threads throughout her studies.

Tanya Henderson Tanya Henderson is an international human rights and gender lawyer focused on advancing the rights of women and women's role in peace-building through U.S. policy, international multi-lateral agencies and civil society, and coalition building among global women political leaders. She recently founded a new international NGO, Mina’s List, to support women’s political parity in national governments around the world. Tanya was previously the Policy Director for Women's Action for New Direction, (WAND); the U.S. National Director for the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF); a legal consultant for the Ministry of Social Affairs in Lebanon on issues of gender-based violence and women’s political participation; and a researcher in conjunction with the Harvard Medical School in Ethiopia to draft policy related to gender inequality, poverty and mental health law.