Clark Anti-Violence Education Program

About Sexual Assault, Relationship Abuse and Stalking

What is Relationship Abuse?

Relationship abuse is defined as a pattern of coercive behaviors that serves to exercise control and power in an intimate relationship. The coercive and abusive behaviors can be physical, sexual, psychological, verbal and/or emotional. Relationship abuse can occur between current or former intimate partners who have dated, lived together, have a child together, currently reside together on or off campus, or who otherwise connected through a past or existing relationship. It can occur in opposite-sex and same-sex relationships.

Examples of relationship abuse include, but are not limited to: attempting to cause or causing bodily injury by hitting, slapping, punching, hair pulling, kicking, sexual assault and/or other forms of unwanted physical contact that causes harm; knowingly restricting the movements of another person; isolating or confining a person for a period of time; controlling or monitoring behavior; being verbally and/or emotionally abusive; exhibiting extreme possessiveness or jealousy.

What is Sexual Assault?

Sexual Assault is any sexual penetration (anal, oral or vaginal), however slight, with any object or sexual intercourse by one or more persons upon another without effective consent. Sexual penetration includes vaginal or anal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger and oral copulation by mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact.

What is Sexual Misconduct?

Sexual Misconduct is any intentional sexual touching of a person, however slight, with any object without effective consent. Sexual touching includes any bodily contact with the breasts, groin, genitals, mouth or other bodily orifice of another or any other bodily contact in a sexual manner. Any disrobing of, or exposure to, another person without effective consent is considered a violation of this policy.

What is Sexual Exploitation?

Sexual Exploitation occurs when a person takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for their own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute Sexual Assault, Sexual Misconduct, or Sexual Harassment.

Examples of Sexual Exploitation include, but are not limited to: making public sexual activity with another person without that other person's consent; prostituting another person; non-consensual video- or audio-taping of sexual activity; going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as letting friends hide in the closet to watch a sexual act); voyeurism; and/or knowingly transmitting an sexually transmitted infection (STI) or HIV to another person.

What is Sexual Harassment?

Sexual Harassment consists of any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. This includes, but is not limited to: submission to, or rejection of, such conduct that is made either implicitly or explicitly a term or condition of employment or participation in an education program; submission to, or rejection of, such conduct that is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting a student; such conduct that has the purpose or effect of interfering with a student's work or academic performance; or such conduct that creates a hostile or intimidating work or academic environment.

What is Stalking?

Stalking is a course of conduct (two or more acts) directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to: a) fear for their safety or the safety of others or b) suffer substantial emotional distress.

Stalking behaviors include, but are not limited to: non-consensual communication (including in-person communication, telephone calls, voice/text/email messages, social networking site postings, instant messages, postings of pictures or information on websites, written letters, gifts, or any other communications that are undesired and/or place another person in fear); following, pursuing, waiting, or showing up uninvited at a workplace, place of residence, classroom, or other locations frequented by a person; surveillance and other types of observation, whether by physical proximity or electronic means; vandalism; trespassing; nonconsensual touching; direct physical or verbal threats against a person and/or their loved ones; gathering of information about a person from family friends, co-workers, and/or classmates; manipulative and controlling behaviors such as threats to harm oneself or threats to harm someone close to that person; and defamation or slander against a person.

Clark University's Sexual Offenses Policy

To see the Sexual Offenses Policy in its entirety, please click here.