Henry J. Leir Luxembourg Program

  • Europa HouseThe May Term in Luxembourg

Academics

For The May Term 2020 (May 12-June 5, 2020), students may enroll in ONE of the following courses: "Memories of Europe: From Total War to Integration," or "Health Inequalities in Europe and the United States." Enrolled Clark students will receive normal day-college credit (1 full unit) upon successful completion.  

May Term 2020 Courses

PSCI 005: Memories of Europe: From Total War to Integration will be taught by Prof. Michael Butler.

Victor Hugo described history as ‘an echo of the past in the future.’ This course will provide students with an opportunity to listen to, and consider the sources of, these echoes from Europe’s sometimes bloody, sometimes brilliant 20th century – while also thinking about their continuing relevance today, for both Europe and the U.S. Using the unparalleled access offered by our location in Luxembourg, together we will consider the political and cultural legacy of major (and familiar) historical events, political developments, and social forces such as World War I, the Great Depression, nationalism and fascism, World War II, the Holocaust, and the evolution of European integration by journeying to the spaces in which they occurred, and continue to be remembered. In doing so, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which public and private narratives, memories, symbols, memorials, and commemorations have shaped construction(s) of ‘Europe’ both past and present. The course will feature field trips to locations throughout the region including sites in Luxembourg, France, and Germany.

"Memories of Europe: From Total War to Integration" carries one full Clark academic unit and a History Perspective. It is taught in English, has no pre-requisites, and is open to all Clark students, including first-year students.

SOC 005: Health Inequalities in Europe and the United States will be taught by Prof. Rosalie Torres Stone.

"Social injustice is killing people on a grand scale"— WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, 2008. Differences in health that are unjust are greater in the United States compared to European countries. What makes us sick is influenced by where people are born, grow, live, work and age. Structural factors beyond our control such as money, power, and resources at global, national, and local levels shape the length and quality of our lives. In this course, we will examine health inequities in Europe and the United States, the social conditions that affect our health, and the medical ethics that underpin our healthcare systems. We will compare and contrast health public policies focused on individual lifestyle factors (smoking, physical exercise, and diet) in the United States and European countries. Students will have the opportunity to learn more about approaches to health and health care outside the U.S. through field trips in Luxembourg and the surrounding regions of France and Germany. We will examine local health related organizations, visit historical sites that have shaped ethical debates in the medical field, explore social determinants of health in urban European city centers, and meet with health care practitioners in the community.

"Health Inequalities in Europe and the United States" carries one full Clark academic unit and a Values Perspective. It is taught in English, has no pre-requisites, and is open to all Clark students, including first-year students.